Did you know: ETHIOPIA has 13 Months in a Calendar Year also Celebrate New Year on September 11th

The Ethiopian calendar consists of 13 months, where the first 12 months each have 30 days and the 13th month has 5 days in a standard year. During a leap year, the 13th month has 6 days.

The Ethiopian calendar (Amharic) is the principal calendar used in Ethiopia and also serves as the liturgical calendar for Christians in Eritrea and Ethiopia belonging to the Orthodox Tewahedo churches, Eastern Catholic Church and Coptic Orthodox Church. It is a sidereal calendar based on the older Alexandrian or Coptic calendar, which in turn derives from the Egyptian calendar, but like the Julian calendar, it adds a leap day every four years without exception, and begins the year on August 29 or August 30 in the Julian calendar. A seven- to eight-year gap between the Ethiopian and Gregorian calendars results from an alternate calculation in determining the date of the Annunciation of Jesus.

Like the Coptic calendar, the Ethiopic calendar has twelve months of exactly 30 days each plus five or six epagomenal days, which comprise a thirteenth month. The Ethiopian months begin on the same days as those of the Coptic calendar, but their names are in Ge’ez. The sixth epagomenal day is added every four years without exception on August 29 of the Julian calendar, six months before the Julian leap day. Thus the first day of the Ethiopian year, 1 Mäskäräm, for years between 1901 and 2099 (inclusive), is usually September 11 (Gregorian). It, however, falls on September 12 in years before the Gregorian leap year.

The current year according to the Ethiopian calendar is 2007, which began on September 11, 2014 AD of the Gregorian calendar

Enkutatash is the word for the Ethiopian new year in Amharic, the official language of Ethiopia, while it is called Ri’se Awde Amet (Head Anniversary) in Ge’ez, the term preferred by the Ethiopian Orthodox Church. It occurs on September 11 in the Gregorian calendar, except for leap years, when it occurs on September 12. The Ethiopian calendar year 1998 ‘Amätä Məhrät (“Year of Mercy”) began on September 11, 2005. However, the Ethiopian years 1996 and 1992 AM began on September 12, 2003 and 1999, respectively.

This date correspondence applies for the Gregorian years 1900 to 2099. The Ethiopian leap year is every four without exception, while Gregorian centurial years are only leap years when divisible by 4; thus a set of corresponding dates will most often apply for a single century. As the Gregorian year 2000 is a leap year, the current correspondence lasts two centuries instead.

Ge’ez, Amharic, and Tigrinya
(with Amharic suffixes in parentheses)
Coptic Julian
(Old Calendar)
Start Date
Gregorian
Start Date
[From March 1900 to February 2100]
Gregorian Start Date
in Year after Ethiopian Leap Day
Mäskäräm (መስከረም) Tut (Thout) August 29 September 11 September 12
Ṭəqəmt(i) (ጥቅምት) Babah (Paopi) September 28 October 11 October 12
Ḫədar (ኅዳር) Hatur (Hathor) October 28 November 10 November 11
Taḫśaś ( ታኅሣሥ) Kiyahk (Koiak) November 27 December 10 December 11
Ṭərr(i) (ጥር) Tubah (Tobi) December 27 January 9 January 10
Yäkatit (Tn. Läkatit) (የካቲት) Amshir (Meshir) January 26 February 8 February 9
Mägabit (መጋቢት) Baramhat (Paremhat) February 25 March 10 March 10
Miyazya (ሚያዝያ) Baramundah (Paremoude) March 27 April 9 April 9
Gənbot (ግንቦት) Bashans (Pashons) April 26 May 9 May 9
Säne (ሰኔ) Ba’unah (Paoni) May 26 June 8 June 8
Ḥamle (ሐምሌ) Abib (Epip) June 25 July 8 July 8
Nähase (ነሐሴ) Misra (Mesori) July 25 August 7 August 7
Ṗagʷəmen/Ṗagume (ጳጐሜን/ጳጉሜ) Nasi (Pi Kogi Enavot) August 24 September 6 September 6
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